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Who We Support: River Cross Gorilla

by Gianluca De Stefano March 16, 2017

Who We Support: River Cross Gorilla

Gorillas are human’s closest cousin

Unlike other animal species, Gorillas share very human-like behaviors and emotions. They can laugh but they can also be very sad. Scientists have discovered that gorillas share 98.3% of genetic code with humans making them our closest cousins after chimpanzees and bonobos.

Where does the word “Gorilla” come from?

The word gorilla comes from the history of Hanno the Navigator, a Carthaginian explorer on an expedition on the West Africa coast – which later became known as Sierra Leone. They encountered "a savage people, the greater part of whom were women, whose bodies were hairy, and who our interpreters called Gorillae." The word was then later used as in reference to the species, though it is unknown whether what these ancient Carthaginians actually encountered were truly gorillas, another species of ape or monkeys, or humans.

In the next couple of weeks, through our gorilla blog we will discover all the gorilla species known to man. Let’s start with the Cross River Gorilla.

The Cross River Gorilla

It is the most western and northern gorilla and is restricted to the forested hills and mountains of the Cameroon-Nigeria border region at the headwaters of Cross River (Nigeria).When comparing the Cross River gorilla to western gorillas, they have noticeably smaller palates, smaller cranial vaults and shorter skulls.

Scientists had been unable to thoroughly study the distribution and abundance of the Cross River gorilla until the last decade or so. Because the gorillas are wary of humans and inhabit rugged territory, scientists have been unable to count many of these gorillas directly. Instead, researchers have used indirect signs, such as nest counts, and estimated range sizes to determine that there are only about 200 to 300 of these gorillas left in the wild.

Decline

The population of Cross River Gorillas has decreased dramatically: since 1995 to 2010 there has been a decline of 59% of its population. A serious threat to this species is the gorilla pet trade. Since baby gorillas unfortunately make desirable pets in some parts of the world, hunters will often kill the adults protecting the baby in order to capture the babies.

 Our Pledge

At Gorilla Socks we are committed to help preserve the endangered gorilla species via our partnership with the Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund International. We pledge to donate to the NGO at least 10% of all our sales. Please click on this link to access all the styles from our launch collection

 



Gianluca De Stefano
Gianluca De Stefano

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